Carolina Drinks: Tomato-Jalapeño Martini

produced by Sami Jackson

recipe by Emily Wiggins

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by Abby Reimer

photography by Alex Dixon

Solving the riddle of healthy-food accessibility is a difficult task—one that is deeply layered and complicated. A group of students at UNC-Chapel Hill believe they’ve found the answer to healthy-food inaccessibility on campus, which they call an urban food desert. They are developing The Sonder Market, a student-run cooperative grocery, but are they targeting the right market?

Speakeasy

by Emily Storrow

photography by Kylie Shryock 

The Crunkleton is a bar that walks the line. Its interior is rustic, yet refined, and it operates with a classy humility. Owner Gary Crunkleton constantly strives for that balance, and sources inspiration from surprising places—including his own ADHD, childhood memories of going to church and years as a Deadhead.

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A Food Guide to Amsterdam

by Della Romano

Uneven rooflines—some jutting out onto the street, others sinking into the structure and still others crooked. Massive windows on each building allow a peek into the lives of the city folk. Canals between every other street reflect the cityscape. You’re in Amsterdam.

 Beyond a gorgeous city, you’ll find a culture based on liberties and freedom. Having fun in Amsterdam is a requirement, and it’s easy to satisfy. Although not known for its food, the Netherlands does not disappoint in cuisine. The flavor combinations are not particularly unique or unexpected, but what the Dutch cook, they cook well.

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Here are some of the more traditional foods you’ll find in Amsterdam:

The Solution to Ballooning Poultry

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writing and graphics by Alex Dixon

When Ba-Da Wings closed in Carrboro in the fall of 2013, it had consistently raised its chicken wing prices. And it wasn’t just Ba-Da, wing prices were, and still are, increasing, forcing restaurants to shift the price to consumers or close completely. But now, restaurants are increasingly capitalizing on a trend to fight thinning margins and volatility of chicken wing prices.

Greek Cuisine

Visualizing Hazing Foods

by Alex Dixon

Across the country, fraternities use food for initiation rituals. We’ve gathered up some stories heard at UNC-Chapel Hill and other schools to bring you some of our favorite hazing dishes (with recipes.)

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Tiramisu: A family recipe

by Della Romano

 Grandma’s handwriting scribbled on a notecard is barely legible. Trying to decipher each letter, desperately hoping that’s a capital T meaning Tablespoon. Also wondering if she copied this recipe down correctly from my aunt. Ingredients are measured by the metric system—in grams and liters—instead of our customary ounces and cups.

Bean-to-Bar:

A Q and A with Hallot Parson, co-founder of Escazú Artisan Chocolates

by Max Gandy

photography by Sami Jackson

Since 2005, Hallot Parson and Danielle Centeno, co-founders of Raleigh’s Escazú have been striving to humanize chocolate by selling “bean-to-bar,”a practice used to ensure consumers that the chocolate has an identifiable geographic origin. Escazú sources its cacao from only Latin America, the closest source to the US, and recycles the unused parts of its beans, most notably by selling the bean husks for local brewing. Carolina Eats writer Max Gandy spoke with Hallot Parson about his experiences with cacao, what sets Escazú apart from other artisanal chocolate producers and the 2005 trip to Costa Rica that inspired his career change.

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(Danielle Centeno and Hallot Parson, co-founders of Escazú)

Maple View Farm

Hillsborough, N.C.

(Anna Tang) 

Alan Sukirin, owner of Mozzarella Kitchen, and João Ritter. Ritter plans on bringing in $2000 by March 8 and shutting down the restaurant from Sunday to Thursday to renovate the restaurant with his friends. Carolina Eats will cover the renovation and Ritter’s investment plan.

Alan Sukirin, owner of Mozzarella Kitchen, and João Ritter. Ritter plans on bringing in $2000 by March 8 and shutting down the restaurant from Sunday to Thursday to renovate the restaurant with his friends. Carolina Eats will cover the renovation and Ritter’s investment plan.

The Last Supper

Things change fast in the restaurant industry. Within a year, Mozzarella Kitchen opened, closed and reopened again. Now, a group of students wants to revive it. 

by Abby Reimer

photography by Alex Dixon

It’s the last night at Mozzarella Kitchen and Alan Sukirin is clearing a table overflowing with plates stained from curry, stroganoff and ginger papaya salad, and empty bottles of wine; the remnants of a five-course fusion feast. 

The Asian-Italian fusion restaurant at 401 W. Franklin St. opened in August. On Feb. 6, Mozzarella Kitchen’s owner and chef, Sukirin, decided to sell off the building. In a few days, the new owner will tear down the moose head that currently hangs on the wall, strip the lace tablecloths and remove the neon lights. 

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(photo courtesy of Brenden Powell) 

Cooped

A look at the poultry industry through the eyes of the farmer.

by Alex Dixon

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When you walk into a chicken house, the smell hits you first. It’s warm, but pungent, like someone lit a cinnamon-feces scented candle inside of your nostrils. Craig Watts walks around the 10-day-old chickens, or broilers, and they scurry off. Some lie down, while others move. But they tend to stay together in little herds, running away from the feet that could easily crush them. One of the broilers is lying against the wall, flailing and inaudibly gasping. Even though it’s still alive, Watts declares it dead and keeps moving. He pins it on a heart attack, probably because the chicken is growing too fast. It’s the genetics.